nm

... among other things.

neil-mckay.com

July 8, 2013 at 4:26pm
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So can a digital depiction of something properly be called a skeuomorph? It is more accurate to refer to it as a visual metaphor that calls to mind a physical skeuomorph without really being one.

— The Economist explains: What is skeuomorphism? | The Economist

1:26pm
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My Top 5 Artists (Week Ending 2013-7-7) →

  1. Tricky (19) 
  2. David Axelrod (12) 
  3. The Nomad (10) 
  4. The Upsetters (9) 
  5. The Congos (8) 

Imported from Last.fm Tumblr by JoeLaz



via ifttt

July 3, 2013 at 8:04pm
270 notes
Reblogged from vicemag
vicemag:

Are You a Nerd? by James Franco
What is a nerd? Are nerds the new cool? That’s what people have been asking ever since video games started making more money than movies. But the reality of nerds is much different than how the media portrays it, as evidenced by American Nerd: The Story of My People. In the book, author Benjamin Nugent explores his own childhood of Dungeons & Dragons, video games, awkward interactions in the schoolyard, and confrontations with jocks to get to the bottom of nerdhood. 
 
Nugent’s thesis is that nerds tend to resemble computers, meaning they are more comfortable with rules and systems they can depend on rather than tacit cues that transpire during social interactions between people. There is even a chapter that compares the general attributes of nerds with those of people with Asperger’s syndrome: an inability to understand body language and facial expressions, odd ticks, awkward behavior, a dependence on predefined conditions, etc. 
Continue

Franco might be Vice’s best columnist, maybe even writer.

vicemag:

Are You a Nerd? by James Franco

What is a nerd? Are nerds the new cool? That’s what people have been asking ever since video games started making more money than movies. But the reality of nerds is much different than how the media portrays it, as evidenced by American Nerd: The Story of My People. In the book, author Benjamin Nugent explores his own childhood of Dungeons & Dragons, video games, awkward interactions in the schoolyard, and confrontations with jocks to get to the bottom of nerdhood. 
 
Nugent’s thesis is that nerds tend to resemble computers, meaning they are more comfortable with rules and systems they can depend on rather than tacit cues that transpire during social interactions between people. There is even a chapter that compares the general attributes of nerds with those of people with Asperger’s syndrome: an inability to understand body language and facial expressions, odd ticks, awkward behavior, a dependence on predefined conditions, etc. 

Continue

Franco might be Vice’s best columnist, maybe even writer.

July 1, 2013 at 10:38am
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My Top 5 Artists (Week Ending 2013-6-30) →

  1. Run the Jewels (35) 
  2. Tricky (28) 
  3. Roots Manuva (14) 
  4. Lee “Scratch” Perry & The Upsetters (14) 
  5. David Axelrod (13) 

Imported from Last.fm Tumblr by JoeLaz



via ifttt

June 30, 2013 at 6:58pm
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I biked around most of Lake Tahoe and all I blogged was this.

June 28, 2013 at 7:44pm
287,474 notes
Reblogged from heyluchie

laughingsquid:

Introversion, A Comic by Luchie

(Source: heyluchie)

3:51pm
58 notes
Oh the vanity.
Switzerland, February 2013.

Oh the vanity.

Switzerland, February 2013.

June 25, 2013 at 5:24pm
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Such a process was necessary, given the innovative design. Obree said: “It was one of those things where I didn’t know exactly what I wanted until I could see how it came into shape. If you’re building it yourself you can make all the fine changes as you go along. If it’s done by someone else, when it comes back you’ll go: ‘Oh, that’s wrong,’ and it could take weeks to fix. But doing it myself, in my own flat, the same process could take an hour.”

The temptation is to create a narrative in which this would be vindication for a man denied the celebrity of Hoy and fellow knight Bradley Wiggins thanks to petty officialdom and the endemic drug taking of early 1990s cycling. Obree, typically, doesn’t see it that way.

— 

Flying Scotsman Graeme Obree returns with beastly bid at another world record | Sport | guardian.co.uk

Good article about a great guy. Quotes combining two interests of mine, product design and cycling.

The first is an example of why I’m working on a startup. The value gained from hands on building and learning, and short iterations is really satisfying.

The second just makes you realize how messed up pro cycling was/is and how innovation still meets resistance and delayed acknowledgment. 

June 24, 2013 at 7:53am
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My Top 5 Artists (Week Ending 2013-6-23) →

  1. The Knife (45) 
  2. David Axelrod (28) 
  3. AFX (27) 
  4. Aphex Twin (12) 
  5. Flying Lotus (10) 

Imported from Last.fm Tumblr by JoeLaz



via ifttt

June 23, 2013 at 11:34am
54 notes
Reblogged from indefensible

What they are trying to say is that disclosure of metadata—the details about phone calls, without the actual voice—isn’t a big deal, not something for Australians to get upset about if the government knows. Let’s take a closer look at what they are saying:

They know you rang a phone sex service at 2:24 am and spoke for 18 minutes. But they don’t know what you talked about.

They know you called Lifeline from The Gap in Sydney (a site of regular suicide attempts). But the topic of the call remains a secret.

They know you spoke with an HIV testing service, then your doctor, then your health insurance company in the same hour. But they don’t know what was discussed.

They know you received a call from the Shooter’s Party while it was having a campaign against gun legislation, and then called your local MP immediately after. But the content of those calls remains safe from government intrusion.

They know you called a gynecologist, spoke for a half hour, and then called a clinic that offers abortions later that day. But nobody knows what you spoke about.

Sorry, your phone records—oops, “so-called metadata”—can reveal a lot more about the content of your calls than the government is implying. Metadata provides enough context to know some of the most intimate details of your lives. And the government has given no assurances that this data will never be correlated with other easily obtained data. They may start out with just a phone number, but matching that to a person is not difficult. The government also wants access to records of your location throughout the day, information which is generated from your mobile phone, even if it’s not a smartphone, or is a smartphone with the GPS functionality disabled.

— Why Metadata Matters | CITIZENS, NOT SUSPECTS (via indefensible)

It’s surprisingly hard to get many people I know to understand this.

'I'm not doing anything wrong, so, I've got nothing to worry about'

Problem is you’ve got to worry about ‘them’ doing something wrong.

(via indefensible)