yakcmlien

... among other things.

neil-mckay.com

February 28, 2014 at 1:59pm
21 notes
Reblogged from pogphotoarchives
pogphotoarchives:

Chaco Canyon, Aerial View
New Mexico - 1929
Photo By: Charles Lindbergh
Negative #130232

pogphotoarchives:

Chaco Canyon, Aerial View

New Mexico - 1929

Photo By: Charles Lindbergh

Negative #130232

(via omgallegos)

February 27, 2014 at 8:42pm
19 notes
Reblogged from cleversimon

There are no laws of English. The point of language is to communicate an idea from one person to another. If your writing does this, it is ‘correct’; everything else is preference.

— Etrigan (via cleversimon)

(via cleversimon)

February 26, 2014 at 4:26pm
1 note

Daring Fireball: Working Backwards to the Technology

One of the things I’ve always found is that you’ve got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. You can’t start with the technology and try to figure out where you’re going to try to sell it.

"That’s why Jobs dismantled Apple’s pure R&D department, the Advanced Technology Group."


(Source: daringfireball.net)

4:01pm
1 note

California Senator Mark Deaulnier’s proposed bicycle tax doesn’t have an amount – that will be left to local jurisdictions who may wish to impose such a tax – but let’s use Colorado Springs’ modest $4 bicycle sales tax as an example. If cyclists pay our “fair share,” the sales tax on a small automobile such as the Prius should come in at a cool $154,000. The Lincoln Navigator and other vehicles with twice the weight of the Prius have a sales tax sixteen times higher, which comes to $2.5 million.

— Cyclelicious » The Fourth Power Rule

February 25, 2014 at 3:22am
115,077 notes
Reblogged from citizendev

caprediem:

what is this.

(Source: citizendev, via afrormosia)

February 24, 2014 at 6:07pm
0 notes

Digital device’s physical context.

A little think on the small digital device’s physical context, and it’s relationship to all the other forms of information in the physical world.
The smart phone is small when compared to everything out there, but it’s information goes deep.


1:38pm
0 notes

My Top 5 Artists (Week Ending 2014-2-23) →

  1. Julian Malone (19) 
  2. Major Lazer (9) 
  3. Clark (8) 
  4. Tricky (5) 
  5. Flying Lotus (5) 

Imported from Last.fm Tumblr by JoeLaz



via ifttt

February 21, 2014 at 3:33am
52 notes
Reblogged from costsmorethanspace
costsmorethanspace:

What costs more than space exploration? WhatsApp.
As reported by seemingly every single person in my Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ feeds, Facebook announced yesterday that they acquired WhatsApp—a text messaging application with nearly half a billion users world wide—for a deal that may be worth as much as $19 billion. Specifically, that package includes $4 billion in cash, $12 billion of Facebook shares,  and as much as $3 billion in restricted shares that vest over time (plus an infite quantity of wishes and dreams for everyone who wants to start a new app startup in the near future). You can find a news article or ten to support every conceivable viewpoint on whether or not this was a wise move, but there’s clearly something in it for Facebook: a service with highly engaged users, a mine of personal user data, and a functional application that it sounds like Facebook won’t shut down.
In 2007, Google—Facebook’s neighbor in Northern California—and the XPRIZE Foundation teamed up to start the Google Lunar XPRIZE. This international competition challenges privately-funded teams to send a robot to the lunar surface to explore, moving around in a controlled fashion for at least a half a kilometer and sending back high definition video. The prize offers first and second place prizes, meaning that potentially multiple robots could successfully explore the lunar surface (there are also various bonus prizes for extra accomplishments, like moving further, surviving the frigid lunar night, or imaging an Apollo landing site). In total, 30 team registered to compete for the prize; almost half of those have since bowed out or been absorbed by their competitors. Several competitors have announced launch plans for 2015 using American, Chinese, and Indian rockets, and several teams have signed up NASA and other well known organizations as customers. To spur this activity, Google has now put up a maximum total prize purse of $40 million—or 1/475th of a WhatsApp. (The operating costs for the Google Lunar XPRIZE are not a matter of public record, but based on public records of other similar incentive prizes, one can guess that they are within an order of magnitude of the prize purse itself, and almost certainly equal to or less than the prize purse.)
Disclosure: I had the great pleasure of running the Google Lunar XPRIZE for several years. It is awesome.

I guess we need to talk to each other, in order to go to space?

costsmorethanspace:

What costs more than space exploration? WhatsApp.

As reported by seemingly every single person in my Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ feeds, Facebook announced yesterday that they acquired WhatsApp—a text messaging application with nearly half a billion users world wide—for a deal that may be worth as much as $19 billion. Specifically, that package includes $4 billion in cash, $12 billion of Facebook shares,  and as much as $3 billion in restricted shares that vest over time (plus an infite quantity of wishes and dreams for everyone who wants to start a new app startup in the near future). You can find a news article or ten to support every conceivable viewpoint on whether or not this was a wise move, but there’s clearly something in it for Facebook: a service with highly engaged users, a mine of personal user data, and a functional application that it sounds like Facebook won’t shut down.

In 2007, Google—Facebook’s neighbor in Northern California—and the XPRIZE Foundation teamed up to start the Google Lunar XPRIZE. This international competition challenges privately-funded teams to send a robot to the lunar surface to explore, moving around in a controlled fashion for at least a half a kilometer and sending back high definition video. The prize offers first and second place prizes, meaning that potentially multiple robots could successfully explore the lunar surface (there are also various bonus prizes for extra accomplishments, like moving further, surviving the frigid lunar night, or imaging an Apollo landing site). In total, 30 team registered to compete for the prize; almost half of those have since bowed out or been absorbed by their competitors. Several competitors have announced launch plans for 2015 using American, Chinese, and Indian rockets, and several teams have signed up NASA and other well known organizations as customers. To spur this activity, Google has now put up a maximum total prize purse of $40 million—or 1/475th of a WhatsApp. (The operating costs for the Google Lunar XPRIZE are not a matter of public record, but based on public records of other similar incentive prizes, one can guess that they are within an order of magnitude of the prize purse itself, and almost certainly equal to or less than the prize purse.)

Disclosure: I had the great pleasure of running the Google Lunar XPRIZE for several years. It is awesome.

I guess we need to talk to each other, in order to go to space?

February 18, 2014 at 4:49pm
320 notes
Reblogged from drydockshop
sfmoma:

drydockshop:

House & Garden’s Complete Guide to INTERIOR DECORATION ©1970

The ’70s were a colorful time… :)

Sofasized

sfmoma:

drydockshop:

House & Garden’s Complete Guide to INTERIOR DECORATION ©1970

The ’70s were a colorful time… :)

Sofasized

February 17, 2014 at 1:23pm
0 notes

My Top 5 Artists (Week Ending 2014-2-16) →

  1. The Very Best (6) 
  2. Rage Against the Machine (4) 
  3. The Knife (4) 
  4. Björk (2) 
  5. Night Genes (2) 

Imported from Last.fm Tumblr by JoeLaz



via ifttt